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A chair of 100 kilos crashes next to a parishioner in front of the Wailing Wall

The Grand Mufti of Jerusalem blamed the event to the Israeli excavations in the basement of the complex

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A chair of 100 kilos crashes next to a parishioner in front of the Wailing Wall

Daniella Goldberg, age 79, knows she's alive as a miracle. The morning of yesterday Monday, while praying in known as "mixed zone" — or egalitarian — of prayer in Wailing wall a huge herodian chair of about 100 kilos of weight was detached from wall and crashed next to it. "I didn't hear or feel anything until I fell at my feet," said Goldberg on Israeli television.

The moment was recorded in video in security cameras of Kotel, Jewish sacred Complex. In recording it can be seen as woman is praying in a corner of platform enabled to pray at foot of Arch of Robinson — on or side of segregated traditional zone, in which men and women pray separately — when suddenly, from a height of about seven m Etros, falls next to her a block of stone that hits stairs to access wooden platform where old woman. "I tried to get incident not to distract me from my prayers," he said.

The devout woman — who comes to place every day at 05:00 in morning — soon explained what happened to Minister of Culture and Sports, Miri Regev, in place of events. The Sillar opened a huge gap in wooden structure floor. "It will do everything necessary in a matter of security so that this does not happen again," Regev said.

The area was closed to public and archaeologists from Antigûedades authority of Israel (AAI) began to work on ground to find out causes of detachment. "AAI experts examine area of fall, with advanced technological instruments, as part of a thorough inspection to avoid new dangers," y announced in a statement. According to text issued by institution, moisture accumulated inside stone, vegetation that breaks through ashlars or degradation of rock could be found between causes of fall. But y won't know for sure until y completely examine wall.

The great Rabbi Askenazi of Israel, David Lau, also moved to place to give pertinent instructions on how to handle detached chair. A sacred stone — according to religious precepts of Judaism — that will remain guarded in rabbi's quarters until it is decided wher it can be returned to its place. The main problem is that to replace it, according to experts, probably should be pierced and fastened with some kind of frame, a manipulation that must be previously approved by rabbis, because it is a sacred object. According to Lau, if Jewish spiritual leaders determine that this is a problem, stone will be buried as Jewish tradition dictates.

Fortunately, or miraculously for some, event occurred when very few devotees were in place but no one escapes that, if it had happened day before, it would have been a catastrophe because area was crowded with faithful who They commemorated Tisha B'va, date on which first and Second Temple were destroyed in Jerusalem. Although that part of Wailing Wall is used by a minority sector, so far this year, in mixed prayer zone where Sillar fell, were held 80 ceremonies of Bar mitzvah, Jewish ritual that marks passage of teenagers to adulthood , according to data provided by Yizhar Hess, director of conservative Movement (Masorti) in Israel.

What for many is a miraculous, or inexplicable fact, for Muslim authority that manages surrounding esplanade of mosques is fruit of archaeological excavations that Israeli authorities and Elad — Jewish organization that manages a complex Archaeological in area and encourages settlement of Jews in east of holy city — y perform in subsoil of religious complex. "The stone did not fall alone. Perhaps it is a warning to Israeli occupation not to continue its excavations in vicinity of Al-Aqsa mosque, "said great mufti of Jerusalem, Sheikh Mohammed Hussein.

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