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A Saudi prince, the owner of the Da Vinci ' Salvator Mundi ', the most expensive painting in history

The New York Times reveals that Bader al Saud was the one who paid 450 million for the play. The Louvre in Abu Dhabi announces that it will be exposed soon

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A Saudi prince, the owner of the Da Vinci ' Salvator Mundi ', the most expensive painting in history

After three weeks of mystery, buyer's identity of most expensive piece of art in history was finally known. The new owner of table Salvator Mundi, an interpretation of Christ by Leonardo Da Vinci, is Saudi Arabian Prince Bader bin Abdullah bin Mohamed bin Farhan al Saud, according to an investigation of new York Times. The work of genius of Italian Renaissance was awarded last month by 450 million dollars, more than twice as much as nearly 180 million dollars paid in 2015 by Women of Algiers (version 0), by Pablo Picasso.

The revelation of Times published this Wednesday is known on same day that it was announced that painting will be exhibited in Louvre of Abu Dhabi. The only branch of prestigious Parisian institution outside France has some 600 works and is considered " first universal Museum in Arab world". The Louvre in Abu Dhabi already has anor Da Vinci's wall, La Belle Ferronnière, lent by Louvre in Paris.

Da Vinci's Salvator Mundi is coming to LouvreAbuDhabi Pic.twitter.com/Zdstx6YFZG

— Louvre Abu Dhabi (@LouvreAbuDhabi) December 6, 2017

The Christie's house, which organized sale of Salvator Mundi, has not revealed identity of buyer, which since realization of auction had generated speculations on who had acquired work.

A mystery that New York Daily has solved from documents it has obtained. According to a story dated in London, owner of most expensive painting in history is a "little known" prince who integrates a "remote branch" of royal family of Saudi Arabia. In addition, according to Energy Holdings ' energy Group portal, from whose governing body Prince Bader is vice-president, Saudi Arabia would have business in telecommunications, real-estate, energy and recycling sectors.

Salvator Mundi is only work of Da Vinci that remains in private hands, according to Christie's.

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