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Heterosexual white man, this is Hannah Gadsby and you must listen to her

Hannah Gadsby grew up illegal. Up to 1997 in Tasmania homosexuality was penalized with jail

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Heterosexual white man, this is Hannah Gadsby and you must listen to her

Hannah Gadsby grew up illegal. Up to 1997 in Tasmania homosexuality was punished with jail. "70% of people I grew up with thought it was a crime and a capital sin. When I identified myself as a lesbian, I was homophobic. You internalize it and you hate yourself. " To fight with that feeling, he kept tension and decided to dump it on a stage. There he threw his jokes, but never told his real story. The truth afflicted him. So humorist, known by Please Like me, decided to leave comedy... telling it in a comedy special.

One hour and three minutes. That's time it takes Gadsby to destroy you with his words, glassy eyes and reality without filters. Nanette, his "humour" monologue, becomes important every second. Their sharp relevance cannot be at a more suitable time. Because, if you are a heterosexual white man (as he writes), it is time to hear truths, it is time to lower subspecies defined by our own rules.

A microphone, a stage and a space open to world like Netflix becomes ideal mix to launch this global message. Humor beats Spectator (Gadsby dares with most atypical mes, "silent gays" to a deep critique, as art historian, alpha male type of Picasso), so that gradually diluted by telling something much more important.

"It's all chaos, be nice." It's most important lesson that Patton Oswalt learned from his dead wife. In Annihilation, also on platform, it follows same strategy: it turns its widowhood into a spectacle of one hour. The comedian was already best monologuists of 21st century, but by transferring his most painful experience to stage, transcends that. It also made Tig notary in its best known monologue. His mor had died, his girlfriend had left her and boards honest: "Good night, I have cancer." The documentary Tig is an ideal brooch in this trilogy of depressive humor. Three tension-filled interpretations that, while not saving ir interpreter, will help spectator cope with life. To weep with laughter and laugh with sorrow. Never leave mood.

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